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20090801
20090831
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CNBC 11
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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
CNBC
Aug 4, 2009 3:00pm EDT
employees are in india. >> the majority of our employees. >> how did you feel when president obama earlier this year talked about providing tax benefits for companies that provide jobs in boulder rather than bombay? >> look, i think that the critical thing to focus on here is how do we get the economies of the world around the world healthy most quickly. the quickest way to do that is to give companies in different parts of the world access to the best talent regardless where that talent is located around the world. there is tremendous talent available in the united states and we are active employers here in the united states. we have 12,000 people in the united states. but equally we've got talent around the world in india, in china, latin america. and we think the best way for to us help our clients be stronger businesses is by givinging you access to that global talent pool. >> state of economy, where are we when you look around the world in terms of whether or not we're going to finally recover here? >> i don't have a crystal ball on the economy. our planning assumption is that the eco
CNBC
Aug 25, 2009 3:00pm EDT
and india and they're going to be growing very, very rapidly. >> that's where the fish are. fish where the fishes are, right? $1.33 billion people in china. >> larry, do you see a move of that magnitude over the next two years? i see growth, recovery, a little bit slow. the consumer may be out of the fetal position, but not really doing a whole heck of a lot right now. that's two-thirds of the economy at least. >> we're bullish. i don't know that we're that bullish. that's a lot to expect given how far we've come. i think you're right. the consume ser truliry weak. retail sales rely lousy. let me put it this way though you. need a weak consumer to prevent a real recovery. in other words, a few quarters of 5 or 6% growth but the consumer comes after the labor market gets going. i think the risk is you get a normal recovery. people are surprised. that will keep this market going. down the road in a couple years, i think where you run into trouble, they've got at some point they have to withdraw some of the stimulus. we can't run these deficits. that's why i'm not so bullish to say 50% hi
CNBC
Aug 26, 2009 3:00pm EDT
's basically the only computer people are going to have in emerging markets. in india a government regulator just put out a report, four times as many people getting on the web on their phones as on their pc. >> what about that? do you buy into some of these trends or are you just literally looking very specifically at dividend plays and value plays? >> well, one of the things that we've seen is the u.s. consumer and consumer around the world is actually continuing to buy stuff, which is great. you would think that with the challenges the consumer has faced over the last year or so in deleveraging and everything else and the job market the way it is the consumers wouldn't be spending. but one of the things that we're hopeful about with the economy is that the consumer's actually out there spending money. >> well, what about the market here? you're talking about a market that's up 50% from the bottom on march 9th or so. >> we think right now we're pretty much as close to a maximum value point for the moment. when third quarter earnings come out, we expect them to be pleasing enough that the m
CNBC
Aug 20, 2009 4:00pm EDT
countries, brazil, india, russiaa, china. russia is still one of the ones you want to be invested? i recognize as oil goes higher it's positive but russia was sort of the outlier there for a little while. >> i'd say we're most focused, you know, at morgan stanley investment management we have an investment emerging markets portfolio manager rushi sharma. i agree with him. we very much like the india story. i'm probably a little more positive on brazil. but we want to stay in the big liquid countries. and we also have a positive bias toward some of the smaller countries where we're seeing catch-up, things like turkey. but there's a lot of interesting things going on in the u.s. versus global. take china versus the u.s. right now. china's financials are trading at almost three times book. the u.s. financials are trading at one times book. and in the near term i think the chinese banks will continue to do well, but ultimately they're going to participate price the way u.s. banks did from excessive lending along the way. there's going to be opportunity we do long, we do long short, and t
CNBC
Aug 26, 2009 4:00pm EDT
profits from india's tata steel looking to soar on reports of higher prices and improving demand. tune in to cnbc world to catch all the action overseas. at cnbc's asia headquarters i'm adam bakhtiar going global with your money. >>> well, high-yield bond funds have had a good month so far. 30-plus percent year returns attracting almost $15 billion in assets. has the rally begun to run too far too fast? joined by jim keegan of the ridgeworth immediate bond fund and brendan white of the touchstone high yield bond fund. gentlemen, good to have you on the program. what's your thoughts, jim? >> at this point, maria, all risky assets have run very far very fast in a short period of time and our view right now is the economy is experiencing what we consider to be transitory growth and it's all about the consumer. the consumer is the lynchpin to the u.s. economy and the global economy and we just see that there's a secular change going on in consumer spending behavior driven by four factors -- less consumption, higher savings, less leverage, more regulation, and higher taxes. >> so what do yo
CNBC
Aug 27, 2009 4:00pm EDT
for a hearing. >>> harley davidson sunounci i e announcing plans to sell its motorcycles in india next year. they're hoping the middle class will trade in smaller, more inexpensive motorcycles for its hogs. >>> what's ahead on "fast money"? hi, rick. >> hi. the traders are going to be breaking down today. stock reversal. give you the plays for tomorrow. >>> plus, hey, we've got the latest from dell's conference call. and the traders and i, of course, are live at 5:00. >> i'll see you in five minutes, rick. thanks so much. >>> up next, several key events tomorrow could have an impact on trading. we'll break it down, what you need to know when the opening bell sounds on friday. some people buy a car based on the deal they get. others by the car of their dreams. during the lexus golden opportunity sales event, you can do both. special lease offers now available on the 2009 es 350. and you know what, it works. nutrisystem for men: flexible new programs personalized to meet your goals. what's great about nutrisystem is you eat the foods you love and you lose weight. i'm dan marino. i lost 22 pou
CNBC
Aug 28, 2009 3:00pm EDT
over opec. it doesn't exercise jurisdiction over china and india's buying of commodities. and it only somewhat exercises jurisdiction over oil companies. they do, however, exercise jurisdiction over users of futures. that's why i think we become the focus. >> right. is it possible -- gary gensler is the head of the cftc. he's been on our program many times. is it possible to say that mr. gensler is between a rock and a hard place right now, that he's got a lot of pressure, that there are people who honestly believe there are dark, maybe mysterious force that's are manipulating things, particularly commodities out there, he wants to get a satisfactory answer? how can he do this without causing so much damage to the markets? what should mr. gensler be doing? >> he's got to look at data. he's got to look hard at what's driving the market and not just take the simple story at face value. if you actually dig in, there are probably good regulations to be had in here, but excluding individual investors from the commodities market by getting rid of commodity etfs can't be the right answer. >>
CNBC
Aug 3, 2009 4:00pm EDT
. now asia is producing for asia. because we have this very big market of china.a. we have india as well. and japan is still a very big economy, even if it's in recession. >> the world is watching to see how china will make this transition from an export-led economy to a consumer-led economy. you think that transition is well on its way? >> we are seeing it. we are feeling it in the philippines. china buys of course a lot of electronics and minerals from us, which fuels their industries, which are also export oriented. but at the same time china is buying a lot of fruits from the philippines, and that is for the consumer economy. >> i want to get your take with regard to what's happening in regard to rice. a couple of years ago we saw rice prices soar. how do you avoid a situation like that happening again? >> well, we've learned a lesson. the economics of rice has changed. because you know, like the philippines, we are -- rice is our staple. we really eat rice all the time and in big quantities.s. but our country is an ark pell ago with lots of mountains and we don't have great plains l
CNBC
Aug 11, 2009 3:00pm EDT
, russia, india and china, the so-called brix don't have a lot in common. the russian economy shrank 11% last quarter, an the largest contraction on record. plummeting commodity prices among the reasons and the government's failure to approve a stimulus package. car sales have been hit particularly hard down 50% in the first seven months of this year. the largest general motors dealership in moscow. compare russia with its neighbor china. massive $586 billion stimulus plan has so far been successful in part due to reliance coupons for direct purchases of things like cars and washing machines. from april to june, the economy grew at a reported 8%, goldman sachs predicts that growth will top 9% for the year. a lot of people are skeptical of it. stuck certainly have great questions about the magnitude. the real question is, should there be a new brick -- a new i, indonesia has as morgan stanley has proposed. thanks for watching. coming in on the closing bell. >> the treasury saw stronger than average demand in its say of $37 billion in three-year notes, part of the record sale of debt this
CNBC
Aug 17, 2009 3:00pm EDT
and domestic fund holders sold equities in india in the past week. what do you make of the chinese story here? >> what i would read into that is china's been the leading indicator of all the economies throughout the world in that they've put their money to work a lot more aggressively than we have where there's a lot of bipartisan debate as to how quickly orr where the money should go. they put it to work and restocked commodities across the boor and that on a week over week basis has been slowing down and if you look at the baltic dry index it's actually down 26% from the june highs and put the june together, slower baltic dry index that's come down, and people sense that perhaps they're taking a step back and the economy that's been surging throughout the world. people are a little bit nervous, and it's hard to argue points made earlier. but i think the best way to go about investing right now is to buy high-quality growth stocks that aren't dependent on the capital markets, that are doing well despite the structural problems that still exist. >> you mention a good point in terms of the bal
CNBC
Aug 19, 2009 3:00pm EDT
because the long-term demand from emerging nations like china and india will in fact drive prices higher, but in the short term it's been that stimulus in china. they've basically stimulated their way to prosperity, but it can only go so far, again, because they're an export economy, unlike us. so unless somebody's there to buy their goods, it can only go so far. >> let me ask you quickly on china, is the chinese market the pullback of 20% over the last two weeks that we've seen in the shanghai market, is it telling us something? the chinese market was first to rebound before we did and first to perhaps top out before we did. >> totally agree with that. in fact, some of the stimulus has been the chinese stock market itself. because really it's a command control economy. once they know the money's not coming in, the market goes right down. so we keep away from that. and the implication is that they've been driving commodity prices higher where rest of the world hasn't had end demand. you wonder how that happened. so our concern is we're going to have a dip before it goes back up. >> you k
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11